Tag Archives: Mike Rohde

Sell Your Work Online

Where’s a good place to sell your photographic (or other) work online? How do you evaluate those marketplaces?

Recently, Molly Jacques, a freelance illustrator, wrote The Freelance Diaries: Supplementing Your Income. In this post she covers 3 things you can sell: sell the original product, sell a digital product and become an affiliate. Molly’s overview got me thinking about the various platforms available now for art listing and sales. Inspired by a section in The Handmade Marketplace called, “Evaluating Marketplaces”, I decided to do some comparison research.

Fork in the Road by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Fork in the Road by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

For the comparison, I chose Creative Market because Molly and sketch noter Mike Rohde list and sell there. It is a “mousemade” only shop. I chose Søciety6  because an artist I follow on Instagram, Tess Wyatt, is there.  I list on RedBubble and I wanted to see how it stacked up with the others. So those are the three I’ll start with. For the topics to compare on, I chose a few to start and refined them during the process.

CAVEAT: I based the information in the table below on my understanding of the information I read today. I could be wrong and by tomorrow the info could be outdated. Base your decision about whether to list with these services on your own understanding of the terms and conditions.

 Topic Creative Market Søciety6

Red Bubble

Products – What can you sell? Photos, graphics, templates, themes, fonts Wall art, clothing, cases & skins, home décor, cards Wall art, clothes, cards, calendars, home decor
Manufacture – Do they make it or do you have to? Digital download only, i.e. “mousemade” not clear if this is Søciety6 or another party from what I read. By 3rd party
Price Range for a single photograph. How much money is in this? $3 to $20 $15 to $20 $6 to $18
Business Terms
License – What rights do  retain? Simple “you retain the rights to your work” non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicenseable and transferable license
Customer Relationship: Can you contact your customer? Yes, you will know the name and contact info for your customer and can answer questions. not clear from what I read on the site No, you will not know the name or contact info of your customer.
Commission / Listing Fee – How much does the listing service take? 30% of sale price The base price for each product includes seller fee$1 for identity verification with Paypal The base price for each product includes seller fee
Payment Options – What kind of account do I need to get paid? Paypal Paypal Paypal, check or ACH Direct Deposit
Payment When – How often will I get paid? 1st of the month, 30 days from sale 1st of the month, 30 days from sale Varies by payment method. 7thst of the month, for Paypal, for all sales in the previous month if your receivables are > $20
Partner Program – Do they have a referral program? 10% of every purchase for a year from all new customers you refer 10% curator commission paid on base price for prints & framed prints. No minimum None

Generally, artists like Jacques list on several platforms so the choice isn’t really either / or. It’s more of a both/and. The questions are , “What are all the options out there?” and “Which fit my target market?”. For more on a diversified online selling strategy, see Laura C George’s blog post, “Why Society6 Can’t be Your Only Strategy.

There are several other listing services out there such as Big Cartel, Etsy, Cafe Press, Amazon, SmugMug and 500px.  However, not all are equally useful in today’s mobile age. For example, Cafe Press, Red Bubble, Creative Market and Søciety6 do not have a mobile app for the seller. Smugmug has an app focused on uploading and following. 500px has a traffic and statistics app available for Plus users. Amazon has some apps but they are not specifically for the seller to manage a shop. However, Big Cartel and Etsy both have seller-focused apps. The ability to manage your store while on the go is key to being responsive.

There are more comparison posts listed below. For photographers, the consensus from the below is that are few sites better than Smugmug but it is too expensive for the sales generated. For handmade work, the consensus seems that Etsy is still the best but there’s a broad array of alternatives that are also good. Don’t take my word for it. Have a look at the below.

What listing services look good to you? What do you use for your store? Are there other factors you’d like to see included?

Send the listing services that you’d like to see explored and if I get 3 I’ll write another comparison post.

Related Posts:

Sketchnotes from the 25th Anniversary PBWC Conference

The Professional Business Women’s 25th Conference today was fantastic! It was my first. In earlier years I watched the event come and go and always wished I had (made) the time to attend. This year, I just decided I was going. And I am glad.

California’s 14th Congressional District Congresswoman Jackie Spier gave the opening keynote address. She talked about political matters such as the feminization of poverty through cuts to programs like food stamps and PEL grants which happen to primarily benefit women. She also talked about her personal approaches such as making time for hugs, friends and to say I love you.

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier's Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier’s Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Jackie encouraged us to fail early and hard because failure is the first step to success. I loved that reframe. I am going to make it my mantra.

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

The next keynote speakers were a pair; Dr. Elizabeth Lindsey, a National Geographic Explorer and Charlotte Beers, notable advertising executive. In tandem they talked about “wayfinding” by understanding what is possible (90-year-old women flirting with the NG staff) and understanding what I want and why I work. Charlotte said “As long as you’re going to work forever, get on with it!”

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Both Elizabeth and Charlotte talked about the choices we make about the stories we believe. We can make other people’s opinions the way we see ourselves or we can make our own opinion the choice. “They” do not get to invent me. I do. “If they don’t like me I will live”. They closed with a quote by Gerard Manley Hopkins:

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

As if the incredible powerhouse so far wasn’t enough, the next keynote speaker was Arianna Huffington. She issued a wakeup call. We only get ~30,000 days to play the game of life. There are 4 pillars that improve our success in living that life: Sleep (#1), Wisdom (taking time to disconnect with devices and connect with ourselves), Wonder and Giving. The thing she said that hit me most was to start each day with what I want from the day. Don’t start with everyone else’s agenda for me.

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna had a lot of great quotes:

Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

She closed by emphasizing the inner work aspect of success:

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Next we broke out into workshops. Sheila Heed, co-author of Difficult Conversations and author of Thanks for the Feedback, shared that so many difficult conversations were about feedback that they decided to study this in detail. Ultimately, they decided to study not the giving of feedback but how to receive it more resourcefully. She divided feedback into 3 types: Appreciation, Coaching and Evaluation and segmented our challenged in receiving feedback into the challenge of seeing the feedback and myself accurately, of responding to relationship triggers, and to mastering identity triggers.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Consistent with the Choice theme in Charlotte and Lindsay’s keynote, she said getting good at receiving feedback doesn’t mean I have to take it. It just means I am better at understanding it.

SEE it and myself accurately first:

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

WE: Enlist the right type of mirror for the job at hand.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

ME: Deal with my part.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We have a choice about how feedback defines us. We can consider it input or we can consider it an imprint. The choice is ours.

Next, I visited Gina Rudan’s Hacking Culture workshop in the afternoon. She said that each one of us create our own culture, particularly in the SF Bay Area.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We can do some cultural curation and chose what works for us and what doesn’t. We can make “The Special”.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina encouraged us to “think like an immigrant” because they leave their cultures behind and chose what works in the new context.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Her favorite quote was by Audrey Lourde:

 

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton was the closing keynote speaker. How awesome is that? With 63 movies to her credit and several books and etc., Diane is going strong.

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane admires women who have their own style their own voice and who have put together their particular collections of “wrong” and turned them into “right.” Her examples included Katherine Hepburn, Joan Rivers, Phyllis Diller and Joan Didion. Her observations were wide-ranging and included “maybe beauty is just love”, “life outlives love”, “Don’t tell me what’s beautiful before I have had a chance to decide for myself”, “I intend to join the babies of the world and laugh more.” Her advice reinforced the theme of deciding for myself my style and voice.

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

It’s very hard to close such an incredible day of giving by the speakers and participants. If I had to summarize I would say, “Go forth and chose, chose now because you’re 30,000 days are ticking, don’t wait, chose, ask, fail hard and get with it. Time’s a wastin’.” We’re choosing already. Let’s make those choices more our style, our voice and what we want out of life.

To See Takes Time: Stiegl Typography Sketched

A recent post on Understanding the Differences between Type and Lettering by Joseph Alessio (@alessio_joseph) on Smashing Magazine shared by The Sketchnote Army (@sketchnotearmy) plus Mike Rohde‘s (@rohdesign) illustration of sketchnote type in his book The Sketchnote Handbook got me noticing letters.

Sunshine Gardens was the first font to piqué my interest. Dinner at Steakout, a beer garden, yielded another treasure, the Stiegl font on a coaster:

Stiegl Coaster in Color photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Stiegl Coaster in Color iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

In black and white, it’s easy to notice the sculpted tails of each letter and the slanted angle of the stair steps:

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Definitely worth a closer look so I spent some time with the coaster and my Tomboy dual flow pens and other tools while “noticing what I noticed” as Lynda Barry teaches:

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

It may seem odd to find font in a photography blog.  However, noticing what you notice in the Wow! Amazing! Everyday! is a great way to improve visual eye and photography.  Much of photographing is about seeing and not all seeing is noticing. Like Georgia O’Keefe said, “to see takes time – like to have a friend takes time.”

What did you take time to see today?

 

Sketchnote Font Find

I’ve hunted for interesting fonts around town to add to my sketchnote “visual library” but I haven’t been finding ANY.  So this morning, when out for a jog on one of my usual routes, the red flash of my favorite sign hidden in an apartment complex made me turn on a dime in my Vibram Five Fingers.  I smacked my forehead for not thinking of this place earlier and made good use of my iPhone and app HDR3 (High Dynamic Range – 3 exposures) by Christopher Herbon to take a pic.

Sunshine Garden Photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 taken with my iPhone using HDR3, edited in Perfectly Clear, Snapseed, Impressions and iResize

Sunshine Garden Photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 taken with my iPhone using HDR3, edited in Perfectly Clear, Snapseed, Impressions and iResize

The sign is cheerful, innocent almost, definitely from another time and I love the font. Here’s my rendition using the lovely Tombow dual brush pens for the grays:

Sunshine Gardens, edited in Perfectly Clear and Camera+ by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Sunshine Gardens Sketchnote, edited in Perfectly Clear and Camera+ by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

I’ve tried looking at a few font identification websites such as What the Font, Adobe Font Finder,  and Identifont (my favorite) to see if I can find this but no such luck. If you are in the know and care to share let us know!

Sketchnote Getting Photos in 1 Place 10 Years in 1 Hand

So how did I do on getting all of my photos from 20 years in one place? I’m half way there!

A Decade of Photos!

Ten years of photos in one hand! On a 500GB G Slim Drive.  Sketchnoting was invaluable in helping me figure out what to do.  (see Mike Rohde and Eva Lotta Lam sites if you’d like to know more.) Sketchnoting also helped me articulate what I actually did and how it worked:

What Worked by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 Edited in Perfectly Clear, FrontView, Snapseed and Impressions

What Worked by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 Edited in Perfectly Clear, FrontView, Snapseed and Impressions

I learned 2 lessons thanks to Technology for Media:

  1. MAC OS Lion can read a PC Drive.  That helped me import photos from a 1 TB Segate PC Backup drive to my G Slim and advance my conversion from PC to MAC.
  2. The Cloud is too slow.  I tried anyway but while ~1 GB per minute is fast for small things, it’s not for gigajobs of 100GB.

Love Your Picks tutorial Edit Your Photos inspired me with “Editing means ruthlessly deleting.” My next steps are to go back through one more time to delete duplicates and hopeless shots before starting a Lightroom catalogue. (Scanning will wait until the Lomography Smart Phone Film Scanner comes out:))

Sketchnote Getting All Your Photos in One Place

Sketchnotes are so fantastic that I decided to sketchnote my way to understanding the pile of images I have accumulated over 20 years of photographing:

Sketchnote of 20 Years of Photo Storage (captured with an iPhone, edited in Perfectly Clear and Front View, by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Sketchnote of 20 Years of Photo Storage (captured with an iPhone, edited in Perfectly Clear and Front View, by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

My photos, and perhaps yours too, live in 3 distinct eras and frameworks:

1. Analog – This is the first column called Negative Binders. I have 10 years of storing negatives! From 16 x 20 inch lith film all the way down to 35mm. There were and still are many film formats and each requires its own size of negative holder or binder. If you include medium formats 6 x 6, 6 x 7, 6 x 9, and 645, you could easily have 9 different film storage needs.  I have bookshelves of these! And with my return to film, I can expect more:)

2. Digital – This is the second column. There are really only 2 photo image formats in the digital era – jpg and raw. This encompasses point and shoots as well as professional cameras such as Canon and Nikon. Everything is stored on a hard disk drive.

3. Mobile – This is the third and largest column. Images are primarily on devices such as my iPhone or iPad and on cloud based services such as Facebook, Twitpic, Instagram or Flickr and in .jpeg, sometimes .tiff and .png.  You may have a copy of the image on your iPhone, iPad, Google Drive, your computer, and an external hard drive. Or you may only have copies on various social networking platforms.

I want to get all these images in one place!

Migrating images from film will be the hardest and take the longest and is the least likely to happen. With the new Lomography Smart Phone Film Scanner I have a better chance of at least converting my favorite 35mm to digital. Follow the green hash lines from the negatives in the lower left to see this path.

Migrating photos from PC to MAC is complicated by the fact that PC and MAC formatted drives aren’t easily compatible.  However, with Cloud based services like Google Drive, Box.net, and Dropbox, it is possible to make this transfer through the cloud.  I have roughly 100GB of photos.  Google Drive is capacity constrained at 10GB so I’ll need to do 10 different transfers.  Ugh but I can see a path through. Follow the green hash lines from the hard disk drive in the second column to follow this path.

Migrating images to a central location is harder than I thought. See all the lines in the last column to follow (or not) this path. I was going to put them on my MacBook Air but it turns out that I only have 60GB of storage.  Oops! I do have an external 500GB G drive which should handle all ~160GB of images that are already in a digital format.  No tellin’ what I’ll need to do with the scans.  I’ll cross that bridge when I come to it.

Wow! I think I’ll start with photos from 2013 today and then go to 2012, like that, year by year.  Or as Annie Lamott wrote, “Bird by bird, buddy.”

Sketchnotes are Fantastic

Austin Kleon‘s recommended reading list in his book Steal Like an Artist continues to yield real gems.  Lynda Barry’s What It Is is the first from Austin’s list that I read and I loved it.  Sketchnotes by Mike Rohde is next on the list.

Here’s my sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike’s book (plain English to follow:):

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde's book Sketchnotes

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde’s book Sketchnotes

I have taken notebooks full of notes but I can’t stand to read them. Mike felt handwritten notes fell short also. I needed a different way to do it and have struggled for some time to find something I’m comfortable with. I take notes so that I can learn better what I’m hearing by engaging in the subject kinesthetically. Rohde points out that taking notes as pictures and words takes advantage of something called dual coding.  We get the verbal by writing the words.  We get even more by making visuals. I tried it out and I love it!

If you ask most adults to draw they panic. Mike defangs drawing by focusing down to 5 basic shapes: square, circle, triangle, line and dot.  Mike shares a technique that a friend taught him of drawing different facial expressions easily and simply to prove that drawings don’t have to be “art”.

Sketchnoting makes everything more interesting!