Tag Archives: arts

Selected for Photo of the Day on AMPt

The AMPt (the Advanced Mobile Photography team) selected my photo, Standing the Tests of Time,  for Photo of the Day last week and featured it on their home page. I am honored! Here’s a screenshot of the week’s Photos of the Day as posted on Instagram.

AMPT Photos of the Day for December 23 through 31

AMPT Photos of the Day for December 23 through 31

So which one is it? It’s in the upper right corner in the image above. Here it is also below:

Standing the Tests of Time by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Standing the Tests of Time by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Yes, you guessed right. This is the same image that was in this post: The Beauty of Different.

The AMPt community is celebrating its one year anniversary today. Head on over to the Advanced Mobile Photography team website to find out more about them.  And have a fantastic first day of the new year!

 

Photo Essay with Diptic

Photo essays are usually a series of pictures related by a theme or a place or a subject. I’ve experimented with collapsing the series into a collage.

There are many tools that you can use for this. Fuzel Pro, Frametastic and Diptic are all great for this.  For my purposes, I’ve used Diptic for a while. After looking at the other options, I decided to continue.

The series I am working on is about the mixed use of land in an area where I often go running. Here’s one experiment  to express that in a collage:

High Voltage © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

High Voltage © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

Diptic has a handy filter feature which allows you to make each photo in the collage have the same color cast and I used it to make sure these black and white’s all looked the same. This version doesn’t support the point because both the subject and the form are so consistent.

Here’s a different version:

Mixed Use 1 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

Mixed Use 1 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

A third attempt from a painterly point of view:

Mixed Use 2 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

Mixed Use 2 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

And lastly, a more straight forward version:

Mixed Use 3 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

Mixed Use 3 © Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

In each photo, there’s some man-made structure in the midst of the landscape. Each structure indicates a different use.

As you look at these 4 different photo essays in the form of the collage…

 

 

Iron Daffodils

I never expected to see daffodils formed in wrought iron. The soft supple saturated yellow petals with tender folds that last a week seemed beyond replication by something so solid, gray, burning red hot then stiffly cold and lasting as wrought iron. But on my morning neighborhood run, iPhone in hand for mobile photography, I discovered, it is possible:

Iron Daffodils in Gray by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Iron Daffodils in Gray by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

When I took the photo with the app Camera+, I had to resist cleaning out the spider webs and pine needles nested in the center cups.  After basic editing and cropping in Snapseed, I used the Infrared filters in the app Dramatic B & W to emphasize the painted grey color. Without brilliant yellow color and soft texture, what you’re left to enjoy are the lovely folds and overall form.

There’s no one right way to interpret this image (just like there’s no one right spaghetti sauce) so using my iPad and various apps, I went on to find another, finally settling on this:

Iron Daffodils by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Iron Daffodils by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

I used the Oil Painting filter in the app PhotoForge to add warmth and color, then Aquarelle to add  softness and Glaze to add texture, then Distressed FX for more texture and brightness. Overall the effect is softer, more painterly and more dreamy than the iron gray version.

Daffodils, of course, look nothing like the iron version, nor the black and white version nor the dreamy version. They are a beautiful thing all of their own. Regardless, it is a delicious surprise to see someone try to copy that flower with a material that is so antithetical in every way. I’m so glad I had my “camera” / iPhone / mobile photography with me!

If you’d like to see some other image interpretations and editing apps try these pages on my blog:

Be Biased

Her words have been reverberating in my head for a couple of weeks now. “Be Biased

I heard her talk, “Translating Science into Poetry“, at the first Write the Docs conference earlier this month. She did the unpredictable – applied principles from poetry to science. Daniya Kamran was her name.  I attended the conference to deliver Sketchnotes: Communicating Complex Ideas Quickly but benefitted most from listening.

She covered 6 techniques used in poetry that were applicable in science. One of those principles was “Bias”. There was a poem which she used to illustrate this principle. I’ve forgotten the name. Something about a glorious morning. Not a neutral, scientific dew-pointed morning, but a morning to make you dance. “Be biased” she said. People crave an opinion, they want an expert, they don’t want to have to do all the thinking required to come up with that opinion. Be a shortcut for them.

Be Biased, Sketchnote from Daniya Kamran's talk Translating Science into Poetry, Write the Docs Conference, by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Be Biased, Sketchnote from Daniya Kamran’s talk Translating Science into Poetry, Write the Docs Conference, by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

I was guilty of what she charged – being professionally objective and….neutral.  I could see that I had withheld my greatest gift, my uniquely developed opinion from my experience and study. And it was making my life much less interesting.

Yet not so in photography. With a camera it is impossible not to have a point of view. You chose what you point the camera at and you chose how to compose the frame. The photographs I like most express personal vision through a unique voice.  Two quick examples:

  • Aaron Ansarov thinks Portuguese Man O’ Wars are beautiful. You will too when you see his work.
  • Natan Dvir thinks NYC billboards overwhelm people. You will see what he sees when you see his work

in her article on AppWhisperer titled, “What is Vision, What is Voice” Cindy Patrick, an award-winning iPhoneographer and fine artist, writes:

All the artists and photographers I admire have one thing in common. They each have a unique style. 

She goes on to say that style has two components: what YOU see (vision) and how YOU communicate that (voice). Vision and voice together are a bias, a point of view.

Since this awakening to the value of bias, I’ve opined more generously, without strings attached. I’ve discovered that the short path to being influential is to express an opinion (I believe “X” because of 1, 2 and 3) and then to have a dialogue. I am both influencer and influenced. Be Biased. Have Vision and Voice.

Thank you Daniya.

Amy Brown did a fantastic job of capturing notes from her talk. You can see my sketchnotes here and here.

If you can find the video of her talk please let me know. I’d like to add it to this post.

Highlights: 1197 Conference and Mobile Photo Awards

Last week I flew to the Big Apple for the second 1197 Conference and the Mobile Photo Awards because my work was in the show! Thanks to Robin Glasser Sacknoff from NYC and Sue Holland (also in the show) and her friends from Toronto for the photos below!

Thanks to Robin Glasser Sacknoff for this photo of me in front of one of my photos in the show

Thanks to Robin Glasser Sacknoff for this photo of me with my Honorable Mention in Architecture

The 1197 conference closed with the Mobile Photography Awards at the Soho Gallery for Digital Arts. Dan Berman (@reservoir_dan), organizer of the awards, produced a great video showing many of the photos that were in the show and the people there. You can see it here on Marty Yawnick’s site, LifeinLoFi.

Thanks to Sue Holland and her bevy of supporters for this photo of me in front of one of my photos.

Thanks to Sue Holland and her bevy of supporters for this photo of me with my 2nd Honorable Mention in Transportation.

The New York Times stopped by the 1197 conference for the Food Photo Challenge and published a great 3 minute video that includes the panelists (Megan Martin, Alejandra Ramos, and Nichelle Stephens), some of the photos and attendees (my 4 seconds of fame are :43 to :48!)

Another thanks to Sue Holland and friends for this photo of me with my work.

Another thanks to Sue Holland and friends for this photo of me with my 3rd Honorable Mention in Transportation

I was so appreciative of the opportunity to meet people in the flesh. I met people whose work I had admired on Instagram such as Cindy Patrick and Carol “Dogsitter” Smith and people whose work I wanted to get to know such as Tim Young and Cindi Hobgood. I had a fantastic time!  I hope you enjoy the photos and videos!

To See Takes Time: Stiegl Typography Sketched

A recent post on Understanding the Differences between Type and Lettering by Joseph Alessio (@alessio_joseph) on Smashing Magazine shared by The Sketchnote Army (@sketchnotearmy) plus Mike Rohde‘s (@rohdesign) illustration of sketchnote type in his book The Sketchnote Handbook got me noticing letters.

Sunshine Gardens was the first font to piqué my interest. Dinner at Steakout, a beer garden, yielded another treasure, the Stiegl font on a coaster:

Stiegl Coaster in Color photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Stiegl Coaster in Color iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

In black and white, it’s easy to notice the sculpted tails of each letter and the slanted angle of the stair steps:

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Definitely worth a closer look so I spent some time with the coaster and my Tomboy dual flow pens and other tools while “noticing what I noticed” as Lynda Barry teaches:

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

It may seem odd to find font in a photography blog.  However, noticing what you notice in the Wow! Amazing! Everyday! is a great way to improve visual eye and photography.  Much of photographing is about seeing and not all seeing is noticing. Like Georgia O’Keefe said, “to see takes time – like to have a friend takes time.”

What did you take time to see today?

 

Sketchnotes are Fantastic

Austin Kleon‘s recommended reading list in his book Steal Like an Artist continues to yield real gems.  Lynda Barry’s What It Is is the first from Austin’s list that I read and I loved it.  Sketchnotes by Mike Rohde is next on the list.

Here’s my sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike’s book (plain English to follow:):

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde's book Sketchnotes

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde’s book Sketchnotes

I have taken notebooks full of notes but I can’t stand to read them. Mike felt handwritten notes fell short also. I needed a different way to do it and have struggled for some time to find something I’m comfortable with. I take notes so that I can learn better what I’m hearing by engaging in the subject kinesthetically. Rohde points out that taking notes as pictures and words takes advantage of something called dual coding.  We get the verbal by writing the words.  We get even more by making visuals. I tried it out and I love it!

If you ask most adults to draw they panic. Mike defangs drawing by focusing down to 5 basic shapes: square, circle, triangle, line and dot.  Mike shares a technique that a friend taught him of drawing different facial expressions easily and simply to prove that drawings don’t have to be “art”.

Sketchnoting makes everything more interesting!