Nevada Weir and The Grace of What Might Be Presented

Recently, I was watching an Adobe Lightroom 4 video called “Lightroom 4 and Nevada Weir” because I’m trying to decide whether to use Aperture or Lightroom in my workflow to corral and tag photos to find the version I want later.  Fortunately, I learned something entirely different from that video.

Nevada’s  experiences as an Outward Bound instructor inspired her to photograph.  She gradually merged the two into a career as a Travel and Fine Art Photography and has some very interesting things to say in that video about her own life lessons from photography:

On converting from film to digital:

“I loved working in the darkroom….seeing those images come up through the stop bath.  When digital appeared there was an uncomfortable moment because ..there’s nothing to feel but once you start working on the computer and start seeing the images come up on the screen, that’s where the magic is.”

On the attitude and stance of a photographer:

“What we’re looking for is “to be consistently good and be conscious. To be in the moment and aware”

On the future and what to do with the present:

“Worrying about something that might happen that isn’t happening is completely unproductive.  What I’d rather do is open myself up to the grace of what might be presented to me.”

It was this last sentence that rang in my ears.  Rather than hurrying along trying to make schedule or worrying about the future, how can I “open myself up to the grace of what might be presented to me”. It’s a question that I’m just starting to ponder. On a recent trip, it meant stopping the schedule to admire the sunset….

Awesome Sunset

Pausing for the Sunset

and being willing to stop the schedule again moments later to capture this barn at dusk for my friend Carol who loves barns.

Red Barn for Carol

Red Barn for Carol

Sometimes it means being willing to accept help and sometimes it means really listening to what someone is saying and the blessing that is inside. I’m still working through what riches lie behind “opening myself up to the grace of what might be presented to me.”

It’s a gift that is definitely worth exploring.