Tag Archives: sketchnotes

6 Takeaways from PBWC 2015

Last year I shared sketchnotes from the 25th Anniversary of the Professional Business Womens Conference. It was my first time to attend and it was fantastic. I had the opportunity to go this year along with 5,499 other women:).  Here are 6 Key Takeaways and sketchnotes from this year.

1. Sallie Krawcheck, Chair of the Elevate Network, among her list of 5 things, memorably quipped, “Ask for the friggin’ money!” She also pointed out that if women use their money as a vote to invest our values, that’s a powerful voice.

Sallie Krawcheck's 5 Things

Sallie Krawcheck’s 5 Things by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

2. Leyma Gbowee, Nobel Peace Laureate and Liberian Women’s Rights Activist, was my favorite speaker. She had such gravitas and lived-in humor! She told the story of how Liberian women are supposed to walk in such a way that their footsteps are not heard and leave no footprints. She reminded us of how often we silence ourselves. She told her journey of deciding to walk loudly and to leave deep footprints. She encouraged us to live so wild that when we walked into a room, people trembled to see us coming and to refuse to live on the sideline. While in retrospect, this seems a bit hyperbolic, it’s exactly the kind of contrast we need to show how much louder we can walk. Walk Loudly!

Speaker: Leyma Gbowee. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Speaker: Leyma Gbowee. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

3. Leeza Gibbons, Emmy Award-Winning Journalist, Radio Host and Apprentice winner, was new to me. She showed us that nice women can finish first if you know what you want. Her mantra was “Work hard, care more, be nice and stand your ground.” I especially loved her saying “Balance is bogus.”  Ain’t that the truth!

Speaker: Leeza Gibbons. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Speaker: Leeza Gibbons. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

4. Leeza didn’t stop there. She had more rich life experiences to offer. She advised us to focus on the value that will get you over the fear. For example, if someone paid you $1M you would probably say yes to a speaking engagement. What would it take to get you to climb over that fear?

Speaker: Leeza Gibbons. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Speaker: Leeza Gibbons. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

5. From the panel discussion, I gleaned the following kernel: “Always talk about my contributions in terms of what impact I drove for the organization.” This is easy to do in a resume. In conversation it seems like braggadocio but it’s really just sharing information about what you did for the organization.

Panel Discussion. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Panel Discussion. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

6. Lastly, the value of an education. We heard a lot of metrics that show how important it is for a woman to get as much education as possible to improve her prospects. PBWC gave out 4 scholarships to some amazing young women. The amount of investment was small at $20K total. This experience gave me a passion to find ways to fund education for women.

Educate a Woman More. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Educate a Woman More. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

In all, I loved going to the PBWC conference. I discovered some amazing and inspirational women like Leeza and Leyma and a passion for a cause, education for women

5 Key Takeaways About Leading with Big Data

Professor Florian Zettlemeyer from Kellogg School of Management did a great job of teaching the Leading with Big Data & Analytics last week. I sketch noted the course and gleaned 5 key takeaways.

1. Analytics Requires Managerial Judgement

While analytics itself can be performed by experts, the decisions that it drives and that are needed for it to thrive have to be made at a strategic level.

Sketchnote Page 1. Instructor Florian Zettlemeyer. Sketchnotes by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Sketchnote Page 1. Instructor Florian Zettlemeyer. Sketchnotes by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

2. The Run The Business Data you’ve got May Not be the Data You Need. This was a real aha for me. Run the business data is optimized for profit and returns. It’s not objective. It is not unbiased. Analytics experiments require random data or an equal chance of each data point being chosen. They require objective data. Most of the time we try to use the data we already have to make decisions rather than understanding the data we need and generating that instead. For example, what data would help solve a churn problem? It isn’t the data we already have.

3. There is a Checklist for Bad Analytics! Any time you see a chart, ask yourself and out loud:

  • Are there pre-existing differences between groups?
  • Is there a common driver of decisions & outcomes?
  • Can you reverse the causality?
  • Is there a plausible coincidence that could also explain the result?
Instructor: Florian Zettlemeyer Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Page 2 Instructor: Florian Zettlemeyer Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

4. You are always sitting on an assumption! Make sure the facts really support that assumption. If you can say “For two years in a row, the difference between the price of these 2 cars has been $500 and we expect that difference to continue (all else being equal.)” then you’ve based your assumption on data.

Instructor: Florian Zettlemeyer. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

Page 3 Instructor: Florian Zettlemeyer. Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2015

5. Make Friends with a Data Scientist. So you can run your crazy ideas by someone and get friendly feedback.

3 Great Reads for the Holidays

How to be Interesting in 10 Simple Steps by Jessica Hagy was on an end-cap at beloved Powell’s in Portland. It’s a great sketch noted thought starter for how one might want to approach things differently in the new year or anytime, whether you want to be interesting or not. For example, Step One: Go Exploring (practice noticing) and Step Two: Share What You Discover (not everyone got to go with you!). Both of these chapters are full of simple spacious sketch notes and the wisdom within is great for photographers or anyone wishing to live at the “intersection of wonder, awe and curiosity.”

3 Great Reads for the Holidays

3 Great Reads for the Holidays

I bought Small Victories, Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace by Anne Lamott at Lifeways, one of the few remaining Christian bookstores in the Bay Area 30 minutes away. The book is a compilation of musings on big questions and small and usually end in a very flesh and blood vignette. Many of these stories had me in a good cry at the end. Anne has such a nice was of tracing the path between abstract thinking and a real live human who likes the way an orange rind peels from the orange.

Though I have read Bird by Bird and Traveling Mercies also by Lamott, I enjoyed Small Victories so much that I looked for more of her recent work also at Powell’s and selected Stitches: A Handbook on Meaning, Hope and Repair. Again, fantastic weaving together of abstract and the real like the steam rising from my morning coffee.  Enjoy!

Sketchnotes for NBCC Published

It’s great when you find a use for your gifts in service of others. Four of my sketchnotes of sermons at New Beginnings Community Church Bay Area have been published on the NBCC Facebook page. People seem to enjoy them so I am sharing them here also.

Habits for the Journey, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

Habits for the Journey, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

All of the sermons and sketchnotes relate to a seven week series called The Journey. This one you can find posted here. For the next week, I tried out some new Jelly Roll Soufflè Pens. They are opaque and made to look best on black paper

The Journey, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

The Journey, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

You can find this one here. The Souffle Pens are very large tipped so it’s hard to draw anything tight. Broad strokes only.

The Journey: Service, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

The Journey: Service, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

This was a good experiment but I went back to my usual pens and paper afterwards.

The Journey: Keep Both Eyes Open, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

The Journey: Keep Both Eyes Open, Sermon by Pastor Hurmon Hamilton, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

You can find this last one on the NBCC FB page.

You can see some of my other entries on sketchnotes:

How to Process Feedback

How to process feedback on our work, families, passions or ourselves is such an important topic. Often we cut ourselves off from feedback because it is often a painful experience.

At the recent PBWC conference, Sheila Heen, co-author of Difficult Conversations and author of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (even when it is off-base, unfair, poorly delivered and frankly, you’re not in the mood), shared that so many difficult conversations were about feedback that they decided to study this in detail. Ultimately, they decided to study not the giving of feedback but how to receive it more resourcefully because it doesn’t matter how good the giver is. It matters how the receiver receives. The receiver is in charge.

Heen shared some great frameworks that help you recognize your role as the receiver. Getting good at receiving feedback doesn’t mean you have to do that, it just means getting better at understanding it.
Three Types of Feedback: Heen divides feedback into 3 types:
  1. Appreciation is very important. Heed shared that 93% of all people who work feel under-appreciated and that 50% of the talent that leaves cites lack of appreciation as a reason. When you ask for “feedback” ask also for appreciation.
  2. Coaching is the next type. Coaching addresses here’s how you could do that better. When you ask for “feedback” ask for coaching. What’s one thing I could do that would help?
  3. Evaluation is the last type. Evaluation addresses here’s how you stack up against the competition.
Challenges in Receiving Feedback: Heen segmented the challenges in receiving feedback into
  1. the challenge of seeing the feedback and self accurately (SEE)
  2. of responding to relationship triggers (WE)
  3. and to mastering identity triggers (ME)

 

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

 

SEE it and myself accurately first. According to brain research there is a 3000% difference (yes, that many zeros) in the way people receive feedback. So we have to coach people on how to give us feedback. We can improve the quality of our feedback conversations by first working to understand the past. What were their expectations? What were the implicit rules? How did they interpret my behavior? When did they see this? Once we understand the past, we can work on the future. What specifically are they asking me to do differently?

 

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

 

WE: Enlist the right type of mirror for the job at hand. We need both a supportive mirror and an “honest” mirror. It is hard to grow without both. When you ask for coaching, you are asking for an honesty mirror. Heen encourages us to ask the people whom we find difficult in part because asking begins to change the relationship.

 

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

 

ME: Deal with my part, mastering identity triggers. Heen says that the hardest feedback for us is the feedback for ourselves. Often that comes in the form of the story that I am telling myself, that we are telling ourselves. Heed gave the example of Olympic Gold, Silver and Bronze medal winners. The Gold medal winners were happy because they came in first. The Bronze medal winners were happy because they made it to the podium. The Silver medal winners were the least happy because the story they tell themselves is, “I didn’t come in first.” Really listen to the story you’re telling yourself around that feedback and realize that you can “tell it slant” in a way that is kinder to you.

While some people are impervious to feedback, Heen also gives a great example of how we “super-size” feedback by effectively “googling” all the things I didn’t do right when we get feedback versus all the things I did right. The challenge is to right-size the feedback to the correct proportion and not let it capsize you.

 

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

 

In the end, Heen’s main point is that we have a choice about how feedback defines us. We can consider it input or we can consider it an imprint. The feedback is not the end of the story but it maybe what I want to work on in the next chapter. The receiver decides.

Next Steps: Heen suggests these as next steps:

  1. Ask for 1 thing from 1 person – “What’s one thing I am doing or failing to do that’s getting in my way?”
  2. Seek to understand the feedback – then ask, “What’s wrong with this feedback and what might be right?”
  3. Let your team and your family see you learn.

Sketchnotes from the 25th Anniversary PBWC Conference

The Professional Business Women’s 25th Conference today was fantastic! It was my first. In earlier years I watched the event come and go and always wished I had (made) the time to attend. This year, I just decided I was going. And I am glad.

California’s 14th Congressional District Congresswoman Jackie Spier gave the opening keynote address. She talked about political matters such as the feminization of poverty through cuts to programs like food stamps and PEL grants which happen to primarily benefit women. She also talked about her personal approaches such as making time for hugs, friends and to say I love you.

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier's Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier’s Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Jackie encouraged us to fail early and hard because failure is the first step to success. I loved that reframe. I am going to make it my mantra.

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

The next keynote speakers were a pair; Dr. Elizabeth Lindsey, a National Geographic Explorer and Charlotte Beers, notable advertising executive. In tandem they talked about “wayfinding” by understanding what is possible (90-year-old women flirting with the NG staff) and understanding what I want and why I work. Charlotte said “As long as you’re going to work forever, get on with it!”

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Both Elizabeth and Charlotte talked about the choices we make about the stories we believe. We can make other people’s opinions the way we see ourselves or we can make our own opinion the choice. “They” do not get to invent me. I do. “If they don’t like me I will live”. They closed with a quote by Gerard Manley Hopkins:

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

As if the incredible powerhouse so far wasn’t enough, the next keynote speaker was Arianna Huffington. She issued a wakeup call. We only get ~30,000 days to play the game of life. There are 4 pillars that improve our success in living that life: Sleep (#1), Wisdom (taking time to disconnect with devices and connect with ourselves), Wonder and Giving. The thing she said that hit me most was to start each day with what I want from the day. Don’t start with everyone else’s agenda for me.

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna had a lot of great quotes:

Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

She closed by emphasizing the inner work aspect of success:

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Next we broke out into workshops. Sheila Heed, co-author of Difficult Conversations and author of Thanks for the Feedback, shared that so many difficult conversations were about feedback that they decided to study this in detail. Ultimately, they decided to study not the giving of feedback but how to receive it more resourcefully. She divided feedback into 3 types: Appreciation, Coaching and Evaluation and segmented our challenged in receiving feedback into the challenge of seeing the feedback and myself accurately, of responding to relationship triggers, and to mastering identity triggers.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Consistent with the Choice theme in Charlotte and Lindsay’s keynote, she said getting good at receiving feedback doesn’t mean I have to take it. It just means I am better at understanding it.

SEE it and myself accurately first:

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

WE: Enlist the right type of mirror for the job at hand.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

ME: Deal with my part.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We have a choice about how feedback defines us. We can consider it input or we can consider it an imprint. The choice is ours.

Next, I visited Gina Rudan’s Hacking Culture workshop in the afternoon. She said that each one of us create our own culture, particularly in the SF Bay Area.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We can do some cultural curation and chose what works for us and what doesn’t. We can make “The Special”.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina encouraged us to “think like an immigrant” because they leave their cultures behind and chose what works in the new context.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Her favorite quote was by Audrey Lourde:

 

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton was the closing keynote speaker. How awesome is that? With 63 movies to her credit and several books and etc., Diane is going strong.

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane admires women who have their own style their own voice and who have put together their particular collections of “wrong” and turned them into “right.” Her examples included Katherine Hepburn, Joan Rivers, Phyllis Diller and Joan Didion. Her observations were wide-ranging and included “maybe beauty is just love”, “life outlives love”, “Don’t tell me what’s beautiful before I have had a chance to decide for myself”, “I intend to join the babies of the world and laugh more.” Her advice reinforced the theme of deciding for myself my style and voice.

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

It’s very hard to close such an incredible day of giving by the speakers and participants. If I had to summarize I would say, “Go forth and chose, chose now because you’re 30,000 days are ticking, don’t wait, chose, ask, fail hard and get with it. Time’s a wastin’.” We’re choosing already. Let’s make those choices more our style, our voice and what we want out of life.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Love

For this WP photo challenge on love I’m going to turn to a bit of persistent pop culture. Out on a jog yesterday, I noticed this VW Beetle colored in graffiti,  a form of hand lettering and artwork. This rolling form of artwork is often called an “art car”.

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed and Impressions

The VW Beetle is an icon that says love in so many ways.  It is laden with old semiotics such as “the summer of love” and “the love bug” and new semiotics such as the art car movement which includes a whole class of VW graffiti. I thought I’d try some water-color to bring out the dreaminess of the allusions. I’m beginning to see that sketchnotes helps my photography both because of what I noticed and what I did with what I noticed:

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed, Aquarelle and Impressions

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed, Aquarelle and Impressions

Then I thought the car would pop more if I made the background recede by desaturating it to black and white so I made a BW version:

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed, Aquarelle and Impressions

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed, Aquarelle and Impressions

While I liked this version I was still interested in my original vision so I layered the color and black and white versions with a mask to get this which looks more like an unfinished painting:

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens

VW Power by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 shot with Hipstamatic, Cano Caphenol film and Loftus lens, edited in Snapseed, Aquarella, PhotoForge2 and Impressions

The “summer of love” is oh so long ago and yet this car still manages to stay dear to the hearts of many and for different reasons in each era from the 1960s to 2013. That’s a long-term love.