Tag Archives: Lynda Barry

Sketchnotes from the 25th Anniversary PBWC Conference

The Professional Business Women’s 25th Conference today was fantastic! It was my first. In earlier years I watched the event come and go and always wished I had (made) the time to attend. This year, I just decided I was going. And I am glad.

California’s 14th Congressional District Congresswoman Jackie Spier gave the opening keynote address. She talked about political matters such as the feminization of poverty through cuts to programs like food stamps and PEL grants which happen to primarily benefit women. She also talked about her personal approaches such as making time for hugs, friends and to say I love you.

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier's Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jackie Speier’s Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Jackie encouraged us to fail early and hard because failure is the first step to success. I loved that reframe. I am going to make it my mantra.

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnotes from Jacke Speier Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

The next keynote speakers were a pair; Dr. Elizabeth Lindsey, a National Geographic Explorer and Charlotte Beers, notable advertising executive. In tandem they talked about “wayfinding” by understanding what is possible (90-year-old women flirting with the NG staff) and understanding what I want and why I work. Charlotte said “As long as you’re going to work forever, get on with it!”

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Charlotte Beers Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Both Elizabeth and Charlotte talked about the choices we make about the stories we believe. We can make other people’s opinions the way we see ourselves or we can make our own opinion the choice. “They” do not get to invent me. I do. “If they don’t like me I will live”. They closed with a quote by Gerard Manley Hopkins:

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Sketchnote of Charlotte Beers & Dr Elizabeth Lindsay Keynote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

As if the incredible powerhouse so far wasn’t enough, the next keynote speaker was Arianna Huffington. She issued a wakeup call. We only get ~30,000 days to play the game of life. There are 4 pillars that improve our success in living that life: Sleep (#1), Wisdom (taking time to disconnect with devices and connect with ourselves), Wonder and Giving. The thing she said that hit me most was to start each day with what I want from the day. Don’t start with everyone else’s agenda for me.

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna had a lot of great quotes:

Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

She closed by emphasizing the inner work aspect of success:

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington's Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Life is Shaped From the Inside Out, Arianna Huffington’s Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Next we broke out into workshops. Sheila Heed, co-author of Difficult Conversations and author of Thanks for the Feedback, shared that so many difficult conversations were about feedback that they decided to study this in detail. Ultimately, they decided to study not the giving of feedback but how to receive it more resourcefully. She divided feedback into 3 types: Appreciation, Coaching and Evaluation and segmented our challenged in receiving feedback into the challenge of seeing the feedback and myself accurately, of responding to relationship triggers, and to mastering identity triggers.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Consistent with the Choice theme in Charlotte and Lindsay’s keynote, she said getting good at receiving feedback doesn’t mean I have to take it. It just means I am better at understanding it.

SEE it and myself accurately first:

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

WE: Enlist the right type of mirror for the job at hand.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

ME: Deal with my part.

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Thanks for the Feedback by Sheila Heen, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We have a choice about how feedback defines us. We can consider it input or we can consider it an imprint. The choice is ours.

Next, I visited Gina Rudan’s Hacking Culture workshop in the afternoon. She said that each one of us create our own culture, particularly in the SF Bay Area.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

We can do some cultural curation and chose what works for us and what doesn’t. We can make “The Special”.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina encouraged us to “think like an immigrant” because they leave their cultures behind and chose what works in the new context.

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Her favorite quote was by Audrey Lourde:

 

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Gina Rudan on Hacking Culture, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton was the closing keynote speaker. How awesome is that? With 63 movies to her credit and several books and etc., Diane is going strong.

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton at the PBWC Podium by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane admires women who have their own style their own voice and who have put together their particular collections of “wrong” and turned them into “right.” Her examples included Katherine Hepburn, Joan Rivers, Phyllis Diller and Joan Didion. Her observations were wide-ranging and included “maybe beauty is just love”, “life outlives love”, “Don’t tell me what’s beautiful before I have had a chance to decide for myself”, “I intend to join the babies of the world and laugh more.” Her advice reinforced the theme of deciding for myself my style and voice.

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Diane Keaton Keynote, Sketchnote by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

It’s very hard to close such an incredible day of giving by the speakers and participants. If I had to summarize I would say, “Go forth and chose, chose now because you’re 30,000 days are ticking, don’t wait, chose, ask, fail hard and get with it. Time’s a wastin’.” We’re choosing already. Let’s make those choices more our style, our voice and what we want out of life.

To See Takes Time: Stiegl Typography Sketched

A recent post on Understanding the Differences between Type and Lettering by Joseph Alessio (@alessio_joseph) on Smashing Magazine shared by The Sketchnote Army (@sketchnotearmy) plus Mike Rohde‘s (@rohdesign) illustration of sketchnote type in his book The Sketchnote Handbook got me noticing letters.

Sunshine Gardens was the first font to piqué my interest. Dinner at Steakout, a beer garden, yielded another treasure, the Stiegl font on a coaster:

Stiegl Coaster in Color photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

Stiegl Coaster in Color iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013

In black and white, it’s easy to notice the sculpted tails of each letter and the slanted angle of the stair steps:

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Coaster in BW iphone photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Definitely worth a closer look so I spent some time with the coaster and my Tomboy dual flow pens and other tools while “noticing what I noticed” as Lynda Barry teaches:

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Stiegl Drawing by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

It may seem odd to find font in a photography blog.  However, noticing what you notice in the Wow! Amazing! Everyday! is a great way to improve visual eye and photography.  Much of photographing is about seeing and not all seeing is noticing. Like Georgia O’Keefe said, “to see takes time – like to have a friend takes time.”

What did you take time to see today?

 

Sketchnotes are Fantastic

Austin Kleon‘s recommended reading list in his book Steal Like an Artist continues to yield real gems.  Lynda Barry’s What It Is is the first from Austin’s list that I read and I loved it.  Sketchnotes by Mike Rohde is next on the list.

Here’s my sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike’s book (plain English to follow:):

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde's book Sketchnotes

Sketchnote of what resonates with me from Mike Rohde’s book Sketchnotes

I have taken notebooks full of notes but I can’t stand to read them. Mike felt handwritten notes fell short also. I needed a different way to do it and have struggled for some time to find something I’m comfortable with. I take notes so that I can learn better what I’m hearing by engaging in the subject kinesthetically. Rohde points out that taking notes as pictures and words takes advantage of something called dual coding.  We get the verbal by writing the words.  We get even more by making visuals. I tried it out and I love it!

If you ask most adults to draw they panic. Mike defangs drawing by focusing down to 5 basic shapes: square, circle, triangle, line and dot.  Mike shares a technique that a friend taught him of drawing different facial expressions easily and simply to prove that drawings don’t have to be “art”.

Sketchnoting makes everything more interesting!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Resolved

Steal Like An Artist by Austin Kleon

Steal Like An Artist Cover, iPhone screenshot of kindle edition.

I found myself turning the lush pages of Lynda Barry‘s book What It Is because I read the minimalist styled pages of Steal Like an Artist: Ten Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative. In the back of the book, Austin Kleon, a fantastic living artist, left a tidy list of 10 or so books that influenced him. This one by Lynda Barry was on that list.

Lynda is another fantastic living artist who makes powerful work. She’s worth sharing. Here’s a nugget that struck home:

“To follow a wandering mind means having to get lost. Can you stand being lost?”

Just quoting Lynda like this isn’t fair to you because it doesn’t give any sense of the richness and power of her work.  Here’s a photo of the page where this quote lives and breathes:

Page quote from Lynda Barry, What It Is

Photo of Page quote from Lynda Barry, What It Is, by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson

This is saturated, colorful, layered and intense.  All that and she’s got great content.  Can You Stand Being Lost?

Whether clinging to vertical career paths in a gig-based labor market, expecting consistent good health throughout life, or goaling ever faster run times in the face of age, when I need my life to conform to a certain map, I am NOT standing being lost. When I need everything I do to have a purpose, to align with my goals, I am NOT standing being lost.

There’s something gained by leaning into the lost times. Moses was probably on-plan when he saw the Burning Bush. He went to explore it. In a sense, he got “lost”. He followed a wandering. And his life, his purpose, his mission were forever changed from what he knew before and for good.

It’s important to have a plan but it’s also important to wander, to stand being lost.  Both are critical to becoming. Elsewhere, in Anna Farova‘s book, Josef Sudek, Poet of Prague, Anna quotes Josef, a fantastic Czech photographer with a long career in photographer from the early 1900s onward:

“I have no particular leaning toward….the all too clearly defined; I prefer the living, the vital, and life is very different from geometry; simplified securing has no place in life.”

New Year’s resolutions seem like Sudek’s geometry while the year that unfolds will be different because it is living and vital. As I begin the New Year, I have no particular leaning toward a resolution of any kind but to ask myself the question,

“Can I Stand Being Lost?”

All writing and images by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013