Category Archives: Workflow

Start Living It

“Our power is never about how pretty we are. Our power is about how we live our lives. Start living it.” Cheryl Strayed, interviewed by Lisa Congdon in A Glorious Freedom.

This grabbed me. So I spent the last 2 weekends investing my spare time in working on art. What does that even look like? For Saturday, October 7, 2017, it looked like this:

  1. Removed old portfolios from view on Behance. – 10 minutes
  2. Searched for and finally found the color negative of an image that Mom had asked for. I went through 8 completely full negative binders, some more than once hunting for this image. Finally found it in 1994.  – 1 hour
  3. Watched the layers basics tutorial for Photoshop on Adobe. – 20 minutes
  4. Scanned the image I found, Paul on the PCT trail – 15 minutes
  5. Ran into tonal range issues with the image so I worked on it in Photomatix 5.0 but that wasn’t enough. Found out there was a version 6 available and downloaded the free upgrade. 10 minutes
  6. Edited the image on PCT in Photomatix and combined 2 versions in Photoshop. – 10 minutes
  7. Ordered 10 prints of the final version printed on Moab Bright from Giclee Today. Not sure that was the right decision. Maybe should have ordered one to test. But the shipping is killer. $7 minimum!  – 40 minutes
  8. Added the image to those available for sale on Red Bubble – 5 minutes
  9. Revised file from sRGB to Adobe RGB color profile in the final file and asked Giclee Today if it was possible to replace. 5 minutes
  10. Wrote this blog entry. Including thinking time in the car, maybe 30 minutes.

On the whole, a good investment of about 3 hours and 30 minutes of time on a Saturday.

940024-1 Paul on PCT010_Merged LoRes ADOBE RGB for web

Embrace the Mess

I am taking Kelly Rae Roberts’ virtual class called Hello Soul Hello Mantras because I love her mixed media artwork. Mixed media is outside my comfort zone and embarking on this journey requires that I embrace the mess of the process and uncertainty of getting there. So my mantra throughout is “Embrace the mess.”

I started with a blank canvas, perfectly white, unspoiled and tidy. The first step is to experiment with water dripped fluid acrylic paint, smooshing it around and brayering it. The result is a simple still unified look but with little depth, sort of a one and done.

Step One in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Step One in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Not being afraid to let go of this stage meant moving on to adding paper, ribbon and other sources of texture recursively. I can’t even recognize the starting image in this next step.

Step Two in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Step Two in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Then more. The dots pulled forward.

Step Two in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Step Two Point Five in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Then it was back to adding more paint, then more collage then more paint, going back and forth until I found some amount of cohesion. See the new dark blue areas?

Step Three in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Step Three in Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Then it was on to adding the text:

Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

I couldn’t quite accept the mess of having the two SS’s so far away from the ME, so with one last change, it’s done:

Final Version: Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Final Version: Embrace the Mess by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

I can’t wait to start the next one!

Scanning Negatives to Your iPhone

If you want images now on a negative to be available on your iPhone there are a few ways to get there for low volume efforts.

I tried an iPics2Go portable scanner for the iPhone 4 and 4S recommended by Dan Burkholder in a recent workshop I attended (and will soon right about). The gizmo is on fire sale and costs less than $15 on Amazon. It looks like this:

Ion iPics2Go

Ion iPics2Go by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

The scan (after inverting in Photo Studio) looks like this:

Scan from Ion iPics2Go Scanner

Scan from Ion iPics2Go Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

It’s a little muddy. The copy on the box boasts high resolution picture scanning but I was only able to get a file of ~150KB.  I also tried the Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner I had written about before. Their gizmo originally offered on Kickstarter costs $50 on Amazon and looks like this:

Lomography Film Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Lomography Film Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

The scan, inverted in the app, looks like this:

Scan from Lomography Scanner

Scan from Lomography Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

The colors are more saturated and the image is sharper. However, the file size is still really small at 155,928 total pixels and that includes all the white space.

If you know how to get a larger file size out of either of these scanners please do tell.

My next step will be to scan this negative using my Canon MG8120 for a 16MB resulting file, edit some in Photoshop on the large screen and then transfer to my phone for further editing.

What’s your strategy for scanning small numbers of negatives to your smart phone?

 

 

Flying Away

A fellow Instagrammer, @randommarcus or Marcus Carlberg, let me know what app he used to shoot one striking photo in his stream. It was Fotor HDR. I tried it out this week on a flight. Here’s the color image as shot but cropped square using the rule of thirds to place the wing tip:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

There are a number of HDR filters in the app to apply. The black and white filter in the Fotor HDR app looked pretty fantastic and a little retro:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Another app, TangledFX has great capabilities to make a photo fly away in a new direction. I gave 4 filters a whirl just to see what happened:

Swirls:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014 using Tangled FX “Swirls” Filter

Brush Strokes:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014 using Tangled FX “Brush Strokes” Filter

The Dark Side:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014 using Tangled FX “The Dark Side” Filter

Cartoon:

Flying Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014

I’ll Fly Away by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2014 using Tangled FX “Cartoon” Filter

These interpretations reminded me of a verse in a bluegrass hymn called “I’ll Fly Away” sung by Alison Krauss:

Some bright morning when this life is over,

I’ll fly away;

to a home on God’s celestial shore,

I’ll fly away (I’ll fly away).

The day before I took this image one of my 17 year-old cats wandered off to “fly away”.   The day after I took this image, the other 17-year-old cat would “fly away” in her sleep at home. I hope both of them are at home on God’s celestial shore.

Related Posts:

Sticky Notes & Quotes, Positive

Printing Large

Grinning, I said, “I’m looking for a long-term relationship….”

My husband raised an eyebrow. “Oh?” with that upward inflection on the “h” that said, “This better be good.”

“…with a printer.” I finished. Used to my love of photography, he chuckled.

In the days of fixer I printed my images in the darkroom. When I had no access to a darkroom I found a local printer whose work I appreciated. When I moved to digital printing I chose to print small and only used photo paper. However, when the bug bites you to go big or print on unusual surfaces, you need special equipment.

Over the last year of printing large(r) than I can do at home and on different surfaces, I’ve explored the services of 3 printers and have been very happy with all 3. Not to worry. No freebies given or taken for my evaluation.

I used Bumblejax in Seattle, WA first. I selected 3 different iPhone4 images and had them printed 18″ x 18″ on aluminum. They arrived shipped in sturdy boxes with lining paper covering each image.  They hung easily and float away from the wall above my studio desk. The user interface on the website is very easy. Bumblejax prints on a variety of surfaces from bamboo, acrylic, raw aluminum, gaterboard and dibond.

Next, I tried Hipstamatic Print Lab for a print of an iPhone4 image. I took the image with Hipstamatic using TinType film and the Salvador84 Lens but the site is app agnostic allowing you to upload any file. I had the image printed the largest the Print Lab offers which is 30″ x 30″. It arrived shipped in a tube and hangs over my desk to remind me to dream BIG. It’s easy to order most print sizes from your phone but large ones need a visit to the website. They also print on a variety of surfaces including canvas, metal, wood panel and an intriguing scroll.

Lastly, I worked with PushDot Studio in Portland, OR to print an iPhone5 image of a magnolia blossom 12″ x 12″ on art paper. This was an in-person consultation and well worth it as I discovered that using the app called Big Photo to increase the number of pixels did not result in the ability to increase the print size.

I would gladly use all 3 printing services again. Who’s your favorite printer or printing service?

Get the Best of Both: The Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner

Yesterday, I used my Kickstarter funded Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner and Lomoscanner app for the first time!

Lomography Film Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Lomography Film Scanner by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

The film scanner allows you to convert film to digital using your smartphone!  It’s great for resurrecting images from film whether old or newly made. This box arrived in March but required AA batteries which I finally got. I also waited for the free companion app Lomoscanner to also come out.  The menu looks like this:

Lomoscanner Menu by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

Lomoscanner Menu by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

If you press the film canister button you can chose among film types from slide to negative as well as black and white.  The + and – buttons allow you to zoom in or out to fill the frame.

The Hair Bun - first scan from my Lomography Film Scanner using my iPhone

The Hair Bun – first scan from my Lomography Film Scanner using my iPhone

The result of my first scan has a very blue cast. I compared it to the print that Blue Moon Camera and Machine in Portland made for me and that I wrote about in Blue Moon Camera Delights.

The Hair Bun - Print by Blue Moon Camera, Photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

The Hair Bun – Print by Blue Moon Camera, Photo by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

The gorgeous soft tones printed from the Kodak Portra film reminded me that there’s some skill involved to get from a negative to a pleasing image.  Rather than attempt to duplicate this result I decided to take the image in a different direction using the plethora of smartphone / iPhone apps available.

The Avante Garde Anachronist by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

The Avante Garde Anachronist by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013

I kept the sprocket holes from Lomoscanner and added a Polaroid border from Lo-Mob to redouble the references to old yet still popular films in a mobile age.  Then, recalling some advice from Cindy Patrick while we were in NYC at the MPA Photo Show, I experimented with the app Iris, renamed Laminar, adding textures and color to various versions before blending them in Image Blender.

The Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner adds an extra workflow input path with a distinct value proposition.  There’s value in printing images from film as well as scanning them into my smartphone / iPhone for more interpretations. The Lomography Film Scanner allows me to get the best of both.

All writing and images by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson © 2013.  Reblogging perfectly okay with author attribution and link to original post.

 

Sketchnote Getting Photos in 1 Place 10 Years in 1 Hand

So how did I do on getting all of my photos from 20 years in one place? I’m half way there!

A Decade of Photos!

Ten years of photos in one hand! On a 500GB G Slim Drive.  Sketchnoting was invaluable in helping me figure out what to do.  (see Mike Rohde and Eva Lotta Lam sites if you’d like to know more.) Sketchnoting also helped me articulate what I actually did and how it worked:

What Worked by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 Edited in Perfectly Clear, FrontView, Snapseed and Impressions

What Worked by Jennifer Hartnett-Henderson ©2013 Edited in Perfectly Clear, FrontView, Snapseed and Impressions

I learned 2 lessons thanks to Technology for Media:

  1. MAC OS Lion can read a PC Drive.  That helped me import photos from a 1 TB Segate PC Backup drive to my G Slim and advance my conversion from PC to MAC.
  2. The Cloud is too slow.  I tried anyway but while ~1 GB per minute is fast for small things, it’s not for gigajobs of 100GB.

Love Your Picks tutorial Edit Your Photos inspired me with “Editing means ruthlessly deleting.” My next steps are to go back through one more time to delete duplicates and hopeless shots before starting a Lightroom catalogue. (Scanning will wait until the Lomography Smart Phone Film Scanner comes out:))